The Bottom Line: 10 Things producers should know when working with indie artists

By Devlin Miles

  1. Know the real budget– this is important to keep artists realistic as they start adding instrumentation or several vocalists. You want artists to respect your time, but it is also important to communicate how the editing process works, best to have this discussion before recording day, so everyone is on the same page. Artists may not be willing to divulge this information because they want to keep money available for the post-production, so be specific. “How much money have you set aside for recording because I anticipate with your style of music and the project ahead to be costly on editing – around 10K.” If the artist looks surprised by this then they really are new to this process and you will have to cut corners with instrumentation and hours whenever possible, but let them know that it might sacrifice the integrity of their life’s work. The artist might appreciate your honesty and either try to find more funding or be willing to cut corners.
  2. Life’s Work – every artist hopefully believes in their project and themselves enough to bring it to the recording studio, so when attitudes fly or people get on edge remember this is the artist’s life work-to-date and they are trying to leave their mark on this world and they need your help to bring the project to life.
  3. Egos – egos are going to fly on both sides to try and win the client, “I worked with so and so or I have toured with so and so.” It is important to be more interested in the project and be open to the possibilities of working together. Pay attention to the person, do you like them, can you work with them for 6-8 weeks?
  4. Do you like it? – Do you like the material/songs the artist is working on? Listen to some of the newer stuff to see if you like what they are doing now verses what they have done in the past.
  5. Timeline – know it and is it realistic based on your current workload and given what the artists vision is for the whole sound of the album?
  6. Don’t be afraid to refer out if the artists genre is not your specialty, better to have a good working respectful relationship than to have it sour because you were not able to track a 32 track album or more
  7. Communicate your expectations in terms of pay and how the files will be managed and given to the artist
  8. Put the agreed to terms in writing, so everyone is accountable for what they agreed to. If you are expecting to get paid hourly regardless of mixing or tuning vocals- you need to communicate that and give an expected budget, nothing worse than being in the middle of the project and not being able to finish due to lack of funs- it kills the momentum of the project and strains the working relationship.
  9. You in the mixWhen giving out mixes give your best mixes possible at that point because the artist is more than likely going to share it with others or fellow musicians that are to play on the album and best to put your best work out there as your calling card to future clients. DO NOT give out shitty mixes that will have the artist questioning your work or work ethic.
  10. Be accountable – if you have made mistakes in recording and know that you can do something better, you might have to suck it up and admit to it and offer your free time in exchange. Your error will be figured out eventually in mixing or mastering and you don’t want to leave a bad impression on other music industry professionals. Also a view from the artists side- Link to: Directing Your Project: 10 Things to ask when interviewing producers & engineers for your project

 (See Help Me!!! 10 Things to Beware of when recording a new album)

 

The Bottom Line  PDF

 

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